Case studies

  • Taiwan, China
    NEW – Waterless Dying Technology in Textile Processing

    A new commercial scale dyeing technology for dyeing synthetic fabric, DyeOx, has been implemented in Taiwan that utilises carbon dioxide (C02) instead of water in the dyeing process. The technology uses no water, no auxiliary chemicals and reduced energy when compared to conventional processes.

    The technology was conceived at DELFT University and commercialized by the start up DyeCoo and Tong Siang Co., a dyehouse in Thailand.

    Nike, the global sportswear chain, recognizing the potential of the technology in helping to achieve its sustainability objectives, entered into a strategic partnership with DyeCoo in 2012 to implement the waterless dyeing technology in one of their Taiwanese factories. This led to a further three Taiwanese factories, who supply other major sportswear brands such as Adidas, making the investment decision to implement the technology.

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  • Lodi, Italy
    NEW – Installation of Soil Moisture Monitoring System to Improve Productivity

    In a search for improved irrigation practices, three farms near Milan, installed a drip irrigation system coupled with soil moisture monitoring as part of the AquaTEK™ programme. This system allows farmers to irrigate only when needed, without stressing the plants by supplying too much or too little water. The system also allows for more precise application of fertilisers (fertigation), and thus minimises the leaching of excess nutrients into the ground.

    The intervention was developed and implemented through a public private partnership between Monsanto, NETAFIM™ Italia, HydroBio Inc and the University of Milan.

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  • Kisumu, Kenya
    NEW – Resource Efficient Cleaner Production in Sugar Factory

    The Lake Victoria Environmental Management Project (LVEMP) is a cross border initiative funded by the World Bank designed to rehabilitate some of the major environmental concerns present in the Lake Victoria Basin.

    One of the pollution hot spots targeted under the program was the Kibos Sugar and Allied Industries factory (KSAI) in Kisumu, Kenya. Under a resource efficient and cleaner production project, the factory reduced pollutant loads of its effluent discharge by 70%. This was achieved through a series of process efficiency measures including metering & controlling, leakage reparation, water reuse and improved wastewater treatment.

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  • United Kingdom
    NEW – Balancing Supply and Demand Through Water Metering

    The government and its regulators require all water companies in England and Wales to plan water resources at least 25 years ahead to ensure secure supplies. This is a twin track approach where the company must consider the cost-effectiveness of demand management measures before they propose resource developments. In 2009 compulsory water metering was identified as the preferred option for meeting the supply demand gap and in 2010 SWS commenced a five year project to install 500,000 intelligent meters. This was accompanied by significant customer engagement and an aggressive leakage reduction programme in order to demonstrate that the company was also working to reduce losses. The metering programme resulted in a 16.5% reduction in water demand.

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  • Cajamarca, Peru
    NEW – Public-private Partnership for Water System Upgrades (64-B)

    Yanacocha implemented a comprehensive water management strategy at the mine releasing 35 000 000m3 of treated effluent per year into the local river. Furthermore, as part of a proposed expansion and in order to address environmental concerns and ongoing disputes over water, it decided to extend its water management programme beyond the mine boundary.

    In March 2012, Yanacocha formed a public private partnership (PPP) with the City of Cajamarca and the Cajamarca Water and Sewerage Company (SEDACAJ) and agreed to invest $13 000 000 between 2012 and 2020 to finance new water infrastructure projects in Cajamarca. This long-term investment project is administered by the Association of Los Andes Cajamarca – ALAC (a local NGO).

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  • Bangladesh, nationwide
    NEW – Partnership for Cleaner Textile Production (IFC Water PaCT) (63-B)

    Weak enforcement of groundwater licencing and effluent treatment standards has led to high rates of water use in the textile mills and discharge of toxic effluents into the surface water bodies.

    The Water PaCT Bangladesh is a partnership founded to drive the wet processing textile sector in the country towards a more sustainable performance and better water and resource efficiency. The partnership is sponsored by the Kingdom of the Netherlands and numerous international apparel buyers and implemented by the International Finance Corporation (IFC), Solidaridad and the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA). PaCT helps individual factories identify and implement Cleaner Production (CP) measures in water, energy and chemical use in the dye house, within the factories’ utilities and effluent treatment plants (ETPs), and through housekeeping. These measures are typically low-cost and easy to implement bringing quick investment return to the factories.

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  • Egypt
    NEW – Institutional Reform for Irrigation Management

    Egypt has less than 700 m3 per capita per annum freshwater availability of which 85% is withdrawn for irrigation purposes. The Integrated Irrigation Improvement and Management Project (IIIMP) in the Nile Delta has been implemented to improve water distribution, quantity, quality, equity and timeliness and hence to increase agricultural production and alleviate poverty.

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  • Mexico
    New – Integrated Irrigation Modernization Project (46-B)

    In addition, operational responsibilities were decentralized and the irrigation infrastructure was transferred to local water user associations (WUA); a key requirement for the financing provided by IBRD (World Bank).

    The locally prioritized improvement plans by the WUAs delivered the rehabilitation of the irrigation system supplying water to 427 100 hectares of farmland. The reduction in leakage in the system coupled with improved on-farm water management made 1 183 million m3 of water available for use and directly benefitted 1.1 million irrigation farmers.

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  • Adana, Turkey
    NEW – Reducing water use in fish and seafood processing

    The Pakyurek seafood processing plant located in Adana primarily produces canned marinated anchovy. The groundwater aquifer, from which the plant is abstracting fresh water for its operations, has been recognised as extremely vulnerable to climate change. The company was selected to participate in the UN Joint Programme “MDG-F 1680 Enhancing the Capacity of Turkey to Adopt Climate Change”, as it operates in a priority industrial sector in the Seyhan River Basin. The programme provided Pakyurek with partial funding and technical advice in order to improve its water footprint. The evaluation of the anchovy processing revealed potential for water reuse and waste minimisation.

    Water treatment units were installed in the thawing (defrosting with water) and gutting stages to reduce water withdrawals by up to 70%. An oil separator was fitted within the new wastewater system and valuable fish oils were recovered as a by product. The project was delivered with the support of the Technology Development Foundation of Turkey (TTGV) in collaboration with the Middle East Technical University(METU) and was partially financed by the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO).

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  • Changxing County, China
    NEW – Zero liquid discharge and water reuse at a coal power plant

    With annual precipitation of 1 000–1 500mm, Lake Taihu gets fair amount of rain but not enough to meet the growing demands of industries located on the lake (chemical, metal, printing, dying industries) and the rapidly growing population. Since the last major algae bloom in April 2007, licence to operate has only been given to industrial plants that control their effluent discharges and air emissions tightly and reduce their water intake from the lake. This environment, together with a national policy on sustainable water resource management under the China 12th five-year plan of 2011-2015 has led to the implementation of the most rigorous zero liquid discharge treatment.

    Operational since May 2015, the wastewater treatment process produces annually 231 000 m3 of treated effluent collected from the Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD) process and cooling tower blow-down and reused in the boiler feedwater purification system. The softening pretreatment sludge is disposed of in a landfill and salts from the process are dried to >95.5% solids and sold to the local chemical industry, cutting the wastewater discharge to zero.

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